Corporate Social Negligence!

A great slip!

                              

kurtvonnegut.jpg

                     

 Kurt Vonnegut slipped away in to memory. He was 84 and  one of the most enchanting writers i have a ever came across! His writing always was a humorist’s (??) account of the times. Be it Slaughterhouse-Five, Jail Bird or God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater. Though most of his novels centered around America, its culture, the American dream and concepts of that sort – he did have a prophetic view, where he could draw a picture about people who inherited wealth and had nothing to do with it, Where some chased a dream and reached hell and so on.

 

I absouletly enjoyed reading him and i am going to collect some more of his books. He made an indelible mark on my psyche. Although most of the searches on net gave accounts about him as a plain humorist but this very piece gives an account of what he really was.

With kurt’s death, the number of literary icons who saw the grim face of catastrophic wars and who constantly beleted out cathartic proses against wars are fast dwindling. We are being pushed in to an intellectual void; where we lack authentic voices of protest. It is indeed a scary thought. It took him 25 years to pen down Slaughterhouse-Five. When asked about this he told :

“You can’t remember pure nonsense,” Vonnegut said. “It was pure nonsense, the pointless destruction of that city, and, well, I just couldn’t get it right. … I kept writing crap, as they say.”

Here is what Guardian’s Phil Bakers has to say:

Vonnegut never attained the literary esteem of JD Salinger, another favourite among young people, and his work retains the stigma of being an adolescent or campus taste. Nonetheless, his snappily expressed disaffection with the ways of what passes for civilisation made him a spokesman for an America that had lost its way after Hiroshima and Vietnam. Humane, funny, quotable, and disarmingly modest, it is as hard not to respect Vonnegut the man as it is to unreservedly admire all of his work. The individual of whom JG Ballard once said “his sheer amiability could light up all the cathedrals in America” is no more. So it goes.

You can gather a bit more than what you need from here

2 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. IndianPad said, on April 17, 2007 at 12:19 pm

    A Great Slip!

    A Great Slip! posted at IndianPad.com

  2. […] 30th, 2007 by clash I myself dedicated some space to acknowledge this great writers death. Now, that over and gone but the reverberations of reading him has not subsided in me. I have been […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: